GRATUITOUS VS. MEANINGFUL VIOLENCE IN CRIME FICTION

There is little debate over the fact that crime fiction is the most popular genre with a female audience, and that over half of these novels are written by women who can be every bit as shocking in their graphic depiction of crimes as their male counterparts. Just about everyone has some limit to their tolerance for violence in a story though. So, how does one write about the depravity humans do to each other and still make it palatable and safe for readers to keep on reading? How can a writer stretch those limits of tolerance for violence without glamorizing, stereotyping and desensitizing readers to the victims of their fictional crimes? Personally, I feel writers have an obligation to use

Specialized Law Enforcement: Tips for Authors

Our chapter of Sisters in Crime chapter hosts a variety of programs for our authors to help them write it right. Recently, we had a specialized law enforcement panel with officers from CSX Railroad, the Virginia Alcohol Beverage and Control Board, and the Virginia Game and Inland Fisheries. Their jobs and jurisdictions are unique, and I picked up some good information for future mysteries. Here are a few things I learned. The railroad police began with the Pinkerton guards. Allan Pinkerton was also the Father of the Secret Service. All of these law enforcement agencies work closely with other local, state, and federal groups. They are often involved in special task force efforts. Railroad tr

Where People Live

Here’s a blog post for readers and writers alike. Please comment if, as a reader, you find that descriptions of a character’s living area provide insight to character motivation. In mystery fiction, it’s a great place to plant clues! Writers, do any of you consciously focus on material description of a character’s home in your setting? As I develop as a writer, and as I distinguish what I like as a reader, I’ve thought about how I benefit from knowing about the homes in which characters live. I like my “Home Tour Havoc” heroine (50 Shades of Cabernet) Olivia Morris so much that I’m writing more adventures for her. As an on-location pet portraitist, she has entre into people’s homes, and I re

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Sisters in Crime Central Virginia 

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I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. I’m a great place for you to tell a story and let your users know a little more about you.